Student Project Descriptions

Biomedical Engineering

Location of Biomedical Engineering Projects: Duderstadt Connector

 

Course BME 450
Faculty Advisor Rachael Schmedlen
Project Name FLO2W
Student Members Miranda St. Amour, Victor Chen, Matthew Elani, Anika Kao, Nathan Lawera
Project Description Our team has designed a low-flow oxygen regulator for use in bronchoscopic balloon dilations to treat tracheal stenosis. Balloon dilation occludes the trachea, but the balloon catheter possesses an inner lumen that traverses the catheter and can be used to deliver oxygen to the lungs. Our flowmeter delivers safe oxygen flow rates through this catheter for the duration of treatment to maintain patient oxygenation.

 

Course BME 450
Faculty Advisor Dr. Rachael Schmedlen
Graduate Student Instructor Madhurima Parigi
Project Name Rotational Cannula for Selective Access of Cystic Duct
Student Members Nicole Johns, Ahsan Ansari, Skylar Buchan, Amy Stoddard, Vijay Vobbilisetty
Project Description Our team, Branched Access Medical, developed a device to allow endoscopists and technicians to reliably access the cystic duct during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This will allow for those patients who are unable to undergo surgery to have a safe and reliable method for diagnosis and treatment of problems in the cystic duct and gallbladder.

 

Course BME 450
Faculty Advisor Rachael Schmedlen
Sponsor University of Michigan Functional Neuroimaging
Graduate Student Instructor Cognitive and Mobility Laboratory
Project Name Sudharsan Srinivasan
Student Members Gait-way to Therapy, Olivia Nelson, Julia Pudar, Samuel Kim, Madhurima Yerra , Olivia Pryor
Project Description Our team, Gait-way to Therapy, is fabricating an in-home therapeutic device for Parkinson’s disease patients that integrates with everyday activities while prompting user movement in a variety of directions. The hope is that this device will assist with ongoing research about how standing and adjustment steps decrease the severity of symptoms such as postural instability and gait difficulties that are often associated with Parkinson’s disease.

 

Course BME 450
Faculty Advisor Prof. Rachael Schmedlen
Graduate Student Instructor Sudharsan Srinivasan
Project Name Auricle Designs
Student Members Jessica Foss, Mitchell Pfennig, Ruta Raulickis, Ryden Lewis, Ryan Carse
Project Description Auricle Designs is working to create an ear-splint to correct congenital ear malformations in children under 3 months, taking advantage of the ability for cartilage to be molded while the child is young.
Course BME 451/452
Faculty Advisor Dr. Rachael Schmedlen
Graduate Student Instructor Tess Bradley
Project Name Improving Embryo Transfer for In Vitro Fertilization
Student Members Kallen Schwark, Diego Vargas, Melissa Cadena, Riely Kuznicki, Derek Trumbo
Project Description Our team has designed a prototype to decrease the minimize of contact with the uterine wall during the embryo transfer process of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Our device will increase the chances of embryo implantation and overall success of the IVF procedure.

 

Course BME 452
Faculty Advisor Dr. Rachael Schmedlen
Sponsor MedSport: University of Michigan Health System
Graduate Student Instructor Tess Bradley
Project Name Adaptive Electronic Goniometer: Flexion Detection
Student Members Chase Barlow, Aditi Batra, Umayal Swarnam, Victor Mondine, Robert MacDonald
Project Description In physical therapy, clinicians evaluate the improvement of their patient’s damaged joints via range of motion (ROM) measurements. These measurements are currently conducted with a basic goniometer during static motions, which don’t translate to improvement outside of the clinic. Our aim is to produce a device that can measure the ROM of joints during functional motion (I.E. running, jumping, reaching) to better evaluate the improvement of their patients joints. The goal is to achieve better clinical outcomes and reduce return trips to the physical therapy clinic.

 

Course BME 452
Faculty Advisor Dr. Gary Weiner
Graduate Student Instructor Tess Bradley
Project Name EfferveSense
Student Members Ryan Miller, Ryan Aoki, Sanjay Subramanian, Adithya Reddy
Project Description Bubble CPAP is a respiratory therapy that delivers positive pressure to the lungs of premature neonates born with conditions such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS). With the existing bubble CPAP apparatus, leaks frequently occur at the nasal interface. When leaks occur, positive pressure is lost, causing vitals to fall to dangerous levels. The EfferveSense Team has designed a leak detection and alert communication system that can notify NICU clinicians in the instance of a clinically relevant bubble CPAP leak.

 

Course BME 452
Faculty Advisor Dr. Rachael Schmedlen
Sponsor C.S. Mott Children's Hospital - Molly Gates
Graduate Student Instructor Tess Bradley
Project Name MINT
Student Members Colin Halow, Brandon Cheung, Jillian Rajkumar, Haley Prout
Project Description Around 60,000 newborns are transported between hospitals in the United States annually, most of whom are born prematurely and require higher levels of care than what the origin hospital can provide. During transport, the neonates are contained and cared for inside a transport incubator through the use of multiple IV lines, catheters, leads, and even ventilation. Today, products on the market used to secure neonates into the incubator lack head support, interfere with external care, lack adjustability for the full range of patient sizes, and are made out of abrasive materials. In developing a novel securement device, MINT seeks to ensure the comfort and safety of the world’s newest and tiniest patients during a critical time in their lives.

 

Course BME 452
Faculty Advisor Dr. Rachael Schmedlen
Sponsor Dr. Alon Weizer
Project Name Preventing Urinary Tract Infections in Patients with Urinary Diversion
Student Members David Cleveland, Amanda Barnes, Carson Hoke, Hannah Rainey
Project Description Our team has partnered with Dr. Alon Weizer of the UM Urology Department to develop a device to prevent UTIs in noncontinent urinary diversion patients. Our device is an irrigation system that aims to reduce the amount of uropathogenic bacteria in the ileal conduit.
Course BME 599
Faculty Advisor Dr. Jan Stegemann
Graduate Student Instructor Olivia Palmer
Project Name CountingSleepzZz
Student Members Camila Luciano, Brittany Gadigian, David Sniecinski, Theodore Sallen, Franklin Qiu,
Project Description Many children experiencing significant behavioral problems as a result of OSA are misdiagnosed and mistreated due to the lack of a readily available, affordable, and comfortable sleep test. Our solution is an affordable HST that is integrated into a comfortable children’s sleep shirt.

 

Course BME 599
Faculty Advisor Dr. Jan Stegemann
Graduate Student Instructor Olivia Palmer
Project Name 10-20 EEG Measuring Device
Student Members Nusayba Tabbah, Farah Huq, Philip Lee, Adam Minchella
Project Description EEG electrodes are placed according to the 10-20 international standard. The standard uses percent calculations gathered from patient head measurements. Because patient head sizes vary, technologists that place EEG electrodes must first measure each patient’s head, calculate the appropriate percentages to obtain correct locations, mark the locations, prep the skin, and place the electrodes. Because measurement and is time consuming and often done hastily, the process is prone to user error and inefficiency. Our proposed solution is a small, handheld measuring wheel that can be used by technologists to measure patient heads, calculate relevant 10-20 percentages for electrode placement, and mark the appropriate locations in swift motions and with little effort. The design ultimately reduces EEG setup time, facilitates calculations and marking, and reduces the likelihood of user error.

 

Course BME 599
Faculty Advisor Professor Jan Stegemann
Graduate Student Instructor Olivia Palmer
Project Name Orthotic Insert for Post-Operative Shoes
Student Members Jordan Scott, Rachel Dick , Joshua LeVay, Megan Grima, Brendan Berg
Project Description We have designed a orthotic insert that will be used in current post-operative shoes following plantar plate repair surgeries. There is currently no postoperative splint, either external or internal, that allows patients to be mobile during their 6 week recovery period and allows patients to regain range of motion while protecting the surgical stitches. Our device therefore allows the patient to plantar flex while preventing dorsiflexion via a wedged toe cavity in combination with a rigid toe shelf plate.

Chemical Engineering

Location of Chemical Engineering Projects: Chrysler Building

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Production of TDI
Student Members David Bielski, Rachel Couvreur, Nichol Francis, Patrick Guffey, Parker Haffey
Project Description The polyurethane industry is continuing to develop its technology to create flexible foams, elastomers, coatings, adhesives, and sealants for applications in automotive, furniture, and other industries. MichiChem is currently exploring opportunities to enter the polyurethane industry through the production of toluene diisocyanate (TDI), an important monomer used to make polyurethanes. Our team has been asked to design a full scale production plant for TDI, which will include designing a process, specifying the product, determining plant capacity, determining process variables, and carrying out an economic analysis of the plant.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Andrew Tadd
Project Name Production of Epinephrine
Student Members Eric O'Neill, Matt Donoughe, Kami Kharazi, Ronak Patel, Yasser Shalabi
Project Description Due to the current shortage and increasing price of commercial anaphylactic shock treatments like the Epipen, our team presents a full design and economic analysis of a pharmaceutical plant to produce GMP compliant stereoselective epinephrine. The plant is designed to produce at a capacity of 25% of the auto-injector market and 25% of the hospital/clinic market.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Andrew Tadd
Project Name TDI Friday's
Student Members Brandon Woo, Steven Walker, Roberto Rodriguez, Iris Ho, Richard Doktycz
Project Description MichiChem, a ficticious company in ChE 487, is currently pursuing opportunities in the polyurethanes industry. Our team, TDI Friday’s, has been tasked with the design of a toluene diisocyanate (TDI) production plant. Our team aims to design a technically feasible plant with a projected 100,000 ton capacity, minimizes environmental impact, and provides layers of safety to operate in accordance to government regulations.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Manufacturing of Epinephrine for Production of Auto-Injectors
Student Members Ja'naysha Hamilton, Kobir Hussain, Lucas Mata, Rushil Bakhshi, Madeline Kaminski
Project Description The overall goal of this project is to develop a production process to produce epinephrine given the growing importance and use of this drug for treating conditions such as anaphylaxis, cardiac arrest and superficial bleeding. Specific objectives for this project include selecting an application or market for the epinephrine, designing a process for producing the epinephrine and scaling a plant to produce the epinephrine to meet an appropriate fraction of the epinephrine market, and finally any regulatory requirements associated with the application and market.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Ethylene Production by Thermal Cracking of Ethane
Student Members Patrick McCauley, Devesh Shah, Jared Molesky, Katelyn Work, Lucy Gao
Project Description Ethylene, used most notably for polyethylene production, can be produced via thermal cracking of ethane. Our team has designed a process to produce high purity ethylene (99.5%) and analyzed the economic feasibility of this proposed process.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Creatine Synthesis for Pre-Workout Production
Student Members Christine Nisula, Emma Moayer, Brandon Dailey, Brent Patterson, Nick Yoo
Project Description Our team, Reactions and Yoo, has developed an industrial process for the production of creatine. In order to increase profitability, we will use our creatine to manufacture a pre-workout shake mix. This project determines the feasibility of this process.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Epinephriends: Production of Epinephrine in a Fast Dissolving Tablet for the Treatment of Anaphylaxis
Student Members Ali Mata, Hannah Strat, Bridgette Rodman, John Penner, Kevin Lim
Project Description Our team was tasked with proposing a process to produce epinephrine. Epinephrine is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) used in EpiPen auto-injectors. The price of a two-pack has increased from $100 to $600 over the last handful of years. Generic auto-injectors are currently on the market but are still expensive to the average consumer. Our team has proposed a fast dissolving sublingual tablet as an alternative treatment method to the auto-injector. This tablet will provide the same lifesaving medicine, via a non-invasive drug delivery route. Our proposed tablet will be more cost effective and have a longer shelf life than a standard auto-injector.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Andrew Tadd
Project Name Production of Glufosinate through Fermentation
Student Members Stuart Nath, Nirvan Battacharyya, Cigdem Kokenoz, Stephen Amori, Joseph Moss
Project Description Due to an increased demand for organic herbicide products, MichiChem has decided to develop an organic alternative to a currently used herbicide to meet demand from large organic farms. The currently synthesized product, glufosinate-ammonium, does not meet the definition of an organic product, and our organically produced product seeks to take advantage of these weaknesses. The task for Culture Shock Solutions (CSS) is to develop a profitable and organic process for producing glufosinate-ammonium using fermentation of Streptomyces bacteria to market the product as an organic herbicide.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Andrew Tadd
Project Name Primary Performance
Student Members Genan Harissa, Pranavi Aradhyula, Mu Niu, Jessica Todsen, Kathryn Moses
Project Description Primary Performance has been tasked by MichiChem to manufacture creatine, which is used in muscle and bodybuilding supplements. Our project includes general process chemistry and economic analysis of our whole plant which has an annual production of 400,000 kg of creatine a year.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Prof. Andrew Tadd
Project Name CreaTeam: The Manufacturing of Supplementary Creatine
Student Members Andrew Peck, Cameren Scharret, Jacob Clendenon, Carmine Finelli, Spencer Paarlberg
Project Description Our team was tasked to produce a process that is capable of producing creatine on an industrial scale. We have performed a design and economic analysis of the production process and created a plant design. The design includes the use of a reactor, a crystallizer and a filter system. We have assessed the economics of this design in order to determine the feasibility of creating a profitable process.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Prof. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Sustainable Ethylene Production via Ethanol Dehydration
Student Members Elizabeth Tom, Daniel Choi, Troy Chen, Felicia Murry, Jeff Zhang,
Project Description "Ethylene is a hydrocarbon commonly used in the manufacturing of polymers, fibers, and chemicals. Our team has designed an alternative ethylene manufacturing process, which produces ethylene through the dehydration of bioethanol rather than the traditional method of steam cracking. Our team will assess the feasibility of this process, and make a recommendation based on the economic viability and environmental impact."

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Professor Andrew Tadd
Project Name Team Grow-Fastinate
Student Members Harrison Hou, Heather Calcaterra, Aydin Eskafi, Janice Sim, Daniel Bunge
Project Description Team Grow-Fastinate is designing the industrial-scale production of the agricultural herbicide glufosinate. A highly effective weed-killer, glufosinate's current production makes it unsuitable for organic foods and leaves a large environmental footprint. Team Grow-fastinate designed a process to produce glufosinate organically from naturally occurring bacteria and conducted an economic analysis of the operation.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Andrew Tadd
Graduate Student Instructor Cash
Project Name Chemical Plant Design for the Production of Creatine
Student Members Justin Rose, Brad Geordt, Taruna Kar, Kiran Prasad, Jon Snoeberger
Project Description A proposed plant design and economic analysis for the production of the athletic supplement creatine on a large scale

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Prof. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Production Analysis of Creatine Monohydrate with Peppermint Extract
Student Members Zachary Drees, Ryan Costa, Jackson Irwin, Jonathan Grygiel, Allisandra Durrett
Project Description Our team has designed a process to produce creatine monohydrate, a popular and proven athletic supplement. Our process focuses on minimizing synthesis byproducts and quelling concerns of gastrointestinal discomfort. Yearly production amounts to 450,000 kg or 15% of the market share. Energy use, plant layout and an economic analysis are also discussed.

 

Course CHE 487
Faculty Advisor Dr. Andrew Tadd
Project Name Production of Toluene Diisocyanate
Student Members Emily McCann, Kolbe Dykhuis, Michael VanderZwaag, Connor LaPres, Justin Huber
Project Description Our team has designed a process for producing toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a key input to producing polyurethane foam. This process starts with toluene and involves three separate reaction steps. We have investigated the technical and economic feasibility of entering the TDI market.
Course CHE 489
Faculty Advisor Professor Erdogan Gulari
Graduate Student Instructor Mario Gutierrez
Project Name PSalt
Student Members Samantha Schwartz, Sebastian Ojeda, Guadalupe Salazar, Sumer Sebik, Xiangyu Zhao
Project Description We are creating a potassium chloride salt substitute using the mineral content found banana peels. Our product, PsalT, will provide individuals and processed food industries with a healthier alternative to Sodium Chloride, therefore combating diseases associated with high sodium intake such as hypertension and kidney stones.

 

Course CHE 489
Faculty Advisor Professor Erdogan Gulari
Project Name SpoilerAlert!
Student Members Adam Bogart, Michael Conder, Ryan Branch, Joanna Ciatti, Madison Corradi
Project Description In 2010, Americans consumed, on average, 20.4 gallons of milk per person. Dairy milk is an everyday consumer item that is bought and sold in large quantities across the United States. However, milk is a perishable product that features only blunt measures of spoilage detection, such as sell-by or use-by dates. These arbitrary dates bear no real significance on whether or not the product has actually gone bad. Our team, SpoilerAlert! is proposing a food-safe spoilage detector that lies in the cap of everyday milk containers. Our SpoilerAlert! technology aims to provide accurate answers on whether your milk has spoiled with ease.

 

Course CHE 489
Faculty Advisor Prof Erdogan Gulari
Project Name FreshenUp
Student Members Abby Ranks, Carly Prast, Bo Mahjour, Rachel Krupp, Emma Keegan
Project Description Our team has developed a new fabric refresher laundry spray, FreshenUp, for those living an on-the-go lifestyle. FreshenUp eliminates odors from clothing and enables consumers to wear clothing for longer periods of time between washing. This is accomplished by chemically and physically removing sweat molecules and bacteria that are the source of odor.

 

Course CHE 489
Faculty Advisor Prof. Erdogan Gulari
Graduate Student Instructor Mario Gutierrez
Project Name ThermaPak
Student Members Evan Stoll, Navraj Singh, Douglas Wu, Jonathan Sohn
Project Description Current methods for heating food or liquid require the use of electrical devices or a flammable fuel source. Our team, ThermaPak, is developing a non-electric flame-less heating device able to heat up food and liquids on the go using a water and calcium oxide reaction. Our poster displays ThermaPak's development and economic analysis for future production.

 

Course CHE 489
Faculty Advisor Prof. Erdogan Gulari
Project Name GoChill
Student Members Caitlyn Hines, Allison Goss, Jeremy Kach, Marcos Hadjicharalambous, Reed Hostrander
Project Description GoChill offers a solution for people who would like to cool their drinks quickly without dealing with melting ice. Our product, GoChill, offers a fast and easy way to cool a drink in a hurry. A pre-frozen “core” can be placed inside of a container filled with the desired beverage, thus cooling the drink to a desired temperature. GoChill delivers a convenient way for someone to enjoy a satisfyingly cool drink without having to wait, while removing the risk of watering down the beverage with an ice cube.

Center for Socially Engaged Design

Location of C-SED Projects: EECS Building

Design Science

Location of Design Science Projects: Duderstadt Atrium

Course DESCI 502
Faculty Advisor Dr. Jeff Hartley
Graduate Student Instructor Yanxin Pan
Project Name A Process Model for Influencing Sustainable Building Design Through Biomimicry
Student Members Sanjana Rajagopalan, Eva Koester, Jonathan Zwier, George Ge Chang
Project Description Biomimicry is a design technique that utilizes biological observations to create sustainable solutions. We plan to create a design process tool to enhance designers knowledge of biomimicry in sustainable building design and how to apply different biomimicry principles to solutions based on the buildings location, surrounding climate, energy needs, etc.

 

Course DESCI 502
Faculty Advisor Jeff Hartley
Graduate Student Instructor Yanxin Pan
Project Name SENSABLE
Student Members Eun Young Chun, Kimberly Reppa, Xinhui Hu
Project Description A design toolkit to help designers to recognize and develop multi-sensory aspects of design during their design process.

 

Course DESIC 502
Faculty Advisor Prof. Jeff Hartley
Graduate Student Instructor Yanxin Pan
Project Name Jobs-To-Be-Done: A Guide
Student Members Steven Hardge, Dominic Schola, Nour Arafat, Xucong Zhan
Project Description In the design process, there are many circumstances where the mainstream User Centered Design (UCD) approach does not yield good results because it makes many assumptions about users and user preferences. Jobs-To-Be-Done (JTBD) framework, on the other hand, addresses this problem by analyzing customers’ choices under specific situations and is able to provide designers with insightful results. Therefore, the team aims to bring this useful tool to existing curriculum of any design courses (e.g. DESCI 501) as an additional module. The JTBD module will start with explaining the theoretical framework itself, go over comparison studies with UCD and interviewing techniques, and end with case studies and a mini project where students will apply learned skills in real-world circumstances. By the end of this module, students should be able to conduct JTBD-style product analysis comfortably, in complement with other design research methods.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Location of EECS projects: EECS Building, BBB Building

Course EECS 430
Faculty Advisor Prof. Brian Gilchrist
Sponsor Naval Research Lab
Graduate Student Instructor Tai Qiao
Project Name Streaming Wireless Video in Hazardous Environments
Student Members Jacob Sigler, David Mayers, Joshua Thomas, Rajeswari Balasubramaniam
Project Description Drones now serve as scouts for forward troops and first responders as they head into hazardous environments. One of the major technical challenges these drones face is the ability to transmit information back through the same hazardous environments they are scouting (sandstorms, rain, ash, etc.). Our project team has partnered with the Naval Research Lab (NRL) to design and validate a link design for this type of drone. This radio link will stream HD video in the 14.5 to 16.5 GHz frequency range, have a range of 6 km, and be robust to environmental conditions.
Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Prof. Hun-Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name Collector Tivan
Student Members Zhan Shi, Nianchen Wu, Lina Zhang, Shijing Zhang
Project Description Nowadays, garbage sorting, especially recyclable garbage sorting, is a worldwide problem. Our project focuses on developing a robot collector that can recognize the recyclable garbage by camera, move to the target garbage, collect and put it in different areas, which is determined by the type of garbage. More ideally, this system should be able to be controlled by human voice and can catch the “moving” garbage, which makes it easier to be used by people.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Hun Seok Kim
Project Name Autonomous Sign Recognition
Student Members Sarah Chen, Rachel Caron, Joshua Fitzpatrick, Jack Waters
Project Description Our project is an autonomous robot specializing in sign recognition. During the exposition it will be demonstrated on a track with street signs. The robot will follow a line, which acts as the road, and will identify and respond to various signs (i.e. stop signs, speed limit signs, etc). The sign recognition was implemented with image processing and machine learning techniques.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Prof. Hun-Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name Adaptive Speakers: Listening Made Better
Student Members Abdulrahman Shehadeh, Sophia Mehdizadeh, Jack Nonnenmacher, Socrates Papageorgiou
Project Description The Adaptive Speakers project is an EECS 452 design project that focuses on using digital signal processing techniques to improve the response of audio systems in any environment. The physical unit that this project aims to create is a series of embedded processors that take input from an audio source and an external microphone and optimizes the frequency response of the output speakers so that the signal being received in the room is as similar to the input signal as possible. The device will be controlled through a mobile interface and will also feature a custom filter and effects section where users can actively determine how they want the output of the system to change.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Prof. Hun Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name Mini MCity
Student Members Bassel Louzon, Mayla Harp, Blake Shaw, David Huang ,
Project Description There has never been a more exciting time in the automotive industry with the development of autonomous vehicles. Our project, Mini MCity, is inspired by the autonomous vehicle era and the University of Michigan’s facility dedicated to the testing of these vehicles. In our project, we aim to demonstrate a simulated city environment in which our vehicle can safely navigate on its own by reacting to signs, obstacles, and directional inputs from users. Our project will be based on concepts in digital signal processing and controls.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Professor Hun-Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name How-To-Draw: A Robot's Perspective
Student Members Isabelle Salley, Meghna Menon, Thaer Arafat, Daniel Oh,
Project Description Our team is developing a robot that is able to take an image as input, via a camera snapshot, and use a combination of image signal processing techniques, control transfer functions, and robotic system to create a drawing of the snapshot image. The final design will include a combination of image signal processing techniques such as Fourier transforms, image masking, various edge detection algorithms, and contour detection algorithms. The robot will be novel in its ability to create a “how-to-draw” step by step series of images on the paper, using sections of Fourier series. We intend to have the robot draw people at Design Expo in real time!

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Hun-Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name GestureBot
Student Members Kevin Bi, Robert Malinas, Chris Stephens, Seth Raker
Project Description GestureBot is a robot that recognizes hand signs and performs different commands based on the hand sign. We use a subset of the American Sign Language for control.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Hun Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name SafeFace
Student Members Victor Yang, Abhinav Reddy, Alondra Lopez, Connor Mackey,
Project Description SafeFace is our vision of a futuristic consumer product for enhanced home security. It uses infrared technology to sense heat movement in a selected area which then activates a real-time facial recognition system using OpenCV to continually learn and store familiar faces. When movement is detected and face identified, a notification of the person’s identity will be sent to a mobile device. If in the event that an unknown face enters the area while the system is activated, an alarm will trigger and speakers will sound.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Prof. Hun Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Sid Venkatesan
Project Name Real-Life Microsoft Paint
Student Members Chris Baldwin, Andrew Turek, Tanvi Jadhav, Leonard Kapiloff
Project Description Real-Life Microsoft Paint is a basic computer graphics tool that can be used with simple hand movements. The user will be able to position their finger in front of a camera and move their hand through the air to create a drawing on a monitor. Other motions of the hand will allow users to perform other basic functionalities seen in Paint, such as changing colors or drawing tools.

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Prof. Hun Seok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name Rock On!
Student Members Zane Phillips, Ana Reyes, Anuj Punjani, Emma Yanakiev
Project Description We have created a digital multi-effects pedal for electric guitar with Bluetooth compatibility. Our effects pedal is small, portable, and can be used with any Bluetooth speaker, eliminating the need for clunky cords and bulky speakers. Effects we are modeling include traditional ones such as wah, fuzz, tremolo, and flanger. We also built some unique effects such as digital models of analog amps, and a room reverb effect. Check out our project and Rock On!

 

Course EECS 452
Faculty Advisor Hunseok Kim
Graduate Student Instructor Siddharth Venkatesan
Project Name Map Construction Robot
Student Members Wenhao Peng, Lili Chen, Yue Dai, Mingyu Yang
Project Description Our team have created a real-time map construction robot using monocular camera for localization. Computer vision and image signal processing techniques are used to get the location of the robot and the surrounding objects. Now, take control on the robot and create your own map!

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name Kefi
Student Members Dominik Konik, Spruce Bondera, Krista Victorsen, Ezra Chung
Project Description A multiplayer action sports video game reminiscent of half-court basketball. Score a goal when the goal is your team's color, prevent goals when it is your opponents' color. But can you coordinate with your teammate when everyone looks the same?

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Prof. Austin Yarger
Project Name Hotpoint Norge
Student Members Maverick Cook, Henry Duhaime, Junius Murphy, Alex Mitchell
Project Description 3 players navigate their way to safety, while trying to avoid the evil player's attempts to stop them.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Prof. Austin Yarger
Project Name Banner of Builders
Student Members Thomas Groechel, Minjoo Kwon, Devin Zhang, Charlie Rogers
Project Description Banner of Builders is a 2v2 Capture the flag game in which players can both shoot players as well as the environment. When breaking the environment, the player is given the ability to rebuild it.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name It Might Snowball
Student Members Yuxuan Ye, Heming Han, Kevin Etchill, Yuanze Zhang
Project Description An exciting snowball fighting game for 4 players!

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Mr. Austin Yarger
Graduate Student Instructor Thomas Bartlett
Project Name Gem War
Student Members Tianyi Wu, He Zhang, Zheng Chen, Yuan Yao
Project Description Gem War is a 2D four-player video game. Players are assigned into two teams. The goal is to steal the gems from the opponents' base and carry them back to his/her own base. The team that carries more gems within a certain amount of time will win.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Graduate Student Instructor Thomas Bartlett
Project Name Yum-Yum Galaxy 2 (A video game by Millenium Eagle Studios)
Student Members Alexandre Rochaix, Adam Cutler, Justin Patrick
Project Description Yum-Yum Galaxy 2 is a competitive team based action game, where each player is a hungry hungry planet. Players absorb planets to grow larger, or engage other players with varying abilities to make them smaller. Players work as a team to be the biggest planets in the arena when time runs out!

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Graduate Student Instructor Gloria Park
Project Name Robot Warfare
Student Members Haidar Hammoud, Nicholas Gaunt, Gary Holiday, Noah Gale
Project Description Robot Warfare is a PVP game that pitches four players against each other. Players will compete against one another to collect as many tokens as they can before the game clock ends. The player with the most tokens wins.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name Rumble
Student Members David Dyer, Jarred McDuffey, Andrew Huang, Emily Siu
Project Description Fight for control of the magical orb against the rival ninja clan to awaken the powerful ancient dragon and claim victory.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Prof. Austin Yarger
Graduate Student Instructor Thomas Bartlett
Project Name Battle of Barosvik
Student Members Andrew Sharon, Evan Czyzycki, Mark Koester, Nicholas Koester
Project Description The Battle of Barosvik is a 3D, 4-person combat game where a team of three vikings have to work together to defeat a golem that is attacking their humble village.

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name Mysterious World
Student Members Wenyang Mu, Shengpu Tang, Yue Tan, Wen Xin
Project Description We are creating a multiplayer, competitive game that uses the VR technology. Enjoy the battle!

 

Course EECS 494
Faculty Advisor Prof. Austin Yarger
Graduate Student Instructor Thomas Bartlett
Project Name Shadow
Student Members Fanzhong Kong, Zizhen Wang, Xinyu Hu, Sijie Tan
Project Description Shadow is 2D platform, single player, puzzle game in which player controls a robot and employs shadow to explore the unknown place and solve puzzles. In the game, the robot needs to carefully control the movement and interact with the environment to finish the game.

 

Course EECS 499
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name Project Swarm
Student Members Michael Siciliano
Project Description Project Swarm aims to decrease the barrier to entry for spectators to jump into games, allowing for large numbers of players to drop in and out of games.

 

Course EECS 499
Faculty Advisor Prof. Austin Yarger
Project Name Project Stargazer
Student Members Zachary Nofzinger
Project Description This project aims to identify and solve major existing challenges in the domain of procedurally-generated content, with an emphasis on the automated generation of space and celestial bodies. As modern video games grow in detail and size, the need for systems to help create the game world grows as well, since hiring additional artists will only help so much. Additionally, publicly documented systems for procedural generation will help smaller, independent game studios create their systems faster, as they don’t have the budget to hire someone to research and design a system on their own.

 

Course EECS 499
Faculty Advisor Austin Yarger
Project Name Project Parrot
Student Members Engin Cem Akdemir, Eray Mitrani
Project Description We are improving the EECS Autograder by using game design methods and technologies in order to improve its educational value and ease of use. The methods we are exploring are user guidance, feedback, progression system, interesting choices and immersive experiences. We believe there is potential in this interactive medium to improve methods of teaching in order to get more engaged students and classroom environments.

Engineering Across Cultures

Location of ENGR 260 projects: BBB Building

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Gregory Hulbert
Project Name India A
Student Members Almira Dogruyol,

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Gregory Hulbert
Project Name India B
Student Members Klara Mateju, Nolan Feeny, Steven Huang, Dalton Geraldo

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Greg Hulbert
Project Name Kenya A
Student Members Joseph Bertha, Anna Pasek, Sebastian Ojeda, Rohan Chandran

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Gregory Hulbert
Project Name Kenya B
Student Members Estefania Escobar, Jia Chen Wee, Patrick Fliearman, Tommy Wong, Kathryn Teske

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Gregory Hulbert
Project Name Kenya C
Student Members Lindsay Rasmussen, Michelle Pawlow, Christine Campbell, Anjali Justice

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Professor Greg Hulbert
Project Name Mexico A
Student Members Sonali Kumar

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof Greg Hulbert
Project Name Mexico B
Student Members Carissa Kathuria
Project Description Poster presentation for class project

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Greg Hulbert
Project Name Mexico C
Student Members Matthew Barnett, Tanvi Jagtap, Carin Quener, Hannah Groenke, Batuhan Akcay

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Greg Hulbert
Project Name China A
Student Members Makenzie Arent, Hyun Chung, Angela Liu, Elizabeth Dale

 

Course ENGR 260
Faculty Advisor Prof. Greg Hulbert
Project Name China
Student Members Umang Lathia, Daniel Huang, Sameer Arora , Kevin Kramer

Honors

Location of Honors projects: Pierpont Commons

Course Honors
Faculty Advisor Doctor Stéphane Lafortune
Project Name Obfuscation Enforcement with Geolocation
Student Members Dylan Lawton
Project Description Personal privacy is becoming increasingly difficult in our current society. It is hard to go anywhere without someone knowing where you are and how long you are there for. Our cell phones are constantly using geolocation to track our locations, pinpointing our exact location, giving intruders opportunities to track your movements, learn your routines, and take advantage of your daily behavior. This is slightly worrisome when there are activities you would like to do covertly without an outside perpetrator being able to monitor you. For example, trips to the ATM, secret meetings with individuals, and ultimately, daily behavior are probably things you do not want to be monitored by a stranger. My project aims to demonstrate privacy enforcement. Namely, I plan on developing an application that will allow a user to be in a physical location, tracked by geolocation, and broadcast to the world that they are actually somewhere else. This concept of obfuscation of your location will confuse intruders and devolve their attempts to track you to mere guessing. Thus, an individual will be able to rest assured that their trip to the ATM is not being tracked and that their privacy is secure. The goal of this project is to inform people that geolocation tracking substantially limits physical privacy, but that there are means to remain physically secure in a world where location tracking and coordinate pinpointing is becoming increasingly easy to do.

 

Course Honors
Faculty Advisor Lec. Andrew Tadd
Sponsor Ann Arbor Distilling Company (A2DC)
Project Name Cooling Water Recirculation for A2DC
Student Members Joanna Ciatti, Raghav Muralidharan
Project Description The Ann Arbor Distilling Company is looking for ways to make their business more financially and environmentally sustainable by using less water. Working with the distillers, we have designed a few ways in which the company can recirculate cooling water.

 

Course Honors
Faculty Advisor Professor Kathleen Sienko
Sponsor Engineering Honors Program
Graduate Student Instructor Ibrahim Mohedas
Project Name Contraceptive Implant Referral Device for Removal
Student Members Saad Khatri
Project Description This project aims to address the issue of whether a contraceptive implant is safe to remove. Ideally, the healthcare professional can feel the implant under the skin by simply palpating the area where the implant is expected to be. But when the implant is too deep, professionals must administer an ultrasound or MRI to help pinpoint the exact location of the contraceptive implant. Since the implant is generally used in low- and middle-income countries, there is high potential of not having the proper equipment to make removal easy. Further, the available healthcare professionals may not have the skills to make removal easy. This project describes a device that a) verifies whether the implant is safe to remove and b) pinpoints the exact location of the implant.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Line van Nieuwstadt
Sponsor Ford Motor Company
Project Name Structural Analysis of Composite to Metal Joints
Student Members Samuel Rumack
Project Description Even with today’s simulation technology, there is still no good way of analyzing composite-to-metal interactions in mechanical design. This is because composites and metals behave very differently under various loading conditions. In addition, the adhesive that binds them, usually epoxy, adds another layer of complexity. The only way to get an accurate understanding of the strength of these joints is by performing physical testing. So, my project is to perform a compression test on variations of the same composite to metal joint to determine which design changes produce the strongest joint. Then I will use the data collected from the physical tests to perform my own simulations and attempt to accurately model the physical test.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Pierre Poudeu
Project Name Bath Deposition of CdS Thin Films
Student Members Matthew Sweers
Project Description My project is an optimization study for the deposition of a thin film of CdS via chemical bath for use in solar cells containing a newly investigated material, Cu4TiSe4.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Andrej Lenert
Sponsor Solar Fridge Project Team
Project Name Solar Fridge
Student Members Michelle Ruffino
Project Description Many communities around the world do not have reliable access to electricity. Additionally, many of these communities are not conveniently located near a larger clinic, and do not have constant access to vaccines. Vaccines must be kept between 2 degrees Celsius and 8 degrees Celsius to prevent degradation (a break in the cold chain cycle). To combat this issue, M-HEAL’s Solar Fridge team is looking to create a solar-powered refrigerator, so vaccine storage on-site will be possible in these communities. After a needs assessment trip in August 2017, the team realized a shift from an adsorption refrigeration system to a solar panel array system may be more beneficial for the Rincon Claro community in the Dominican Republic.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Ella Atkins
Project Name Cyber-Physical Thermal Modeling for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems
Student Members Kathryn Henry, Madison Gallant
Project Description Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) can face nontrivial overheating challenges in environments with high ambient temperatures and solar insolation levels. Heat generated by propulsion, battery, and computer systems can be difficult to manage in such conditions. This research presents results from a series of experiments designed to characterize heating and cooling profiles for an electric-powered small UAS. Heating and cooling curves were fit to acquired data. These experimentally-derived thermal models can be used in future cyber-physical UAS models to enable tradeoffs over computational, power, and propulsion system use due to expected thermal load during mission planning and real-time flight.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Mark Daskin
Project Name Developing and Implementing a Purchasing System to Ensure Internal Controls for the Industrial and Operations Engineering Department at the University of Michigan
Student Members Carrianna Voellm
Project Description The project developed and implemented a purchasing system for the Industrial and Operations Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. The goal was to create a standardized system so that all purchasing occurred in the same way through the same system. The project involved 5 main aspects: assessing the current purchasing methods being used, learning about the developed purchasing system, making any necessary changes to the system, implementing it in a pilot with staff members in the IOE Department, and then rolling the system out to students and faculty as well. The purpose of the project was to implement internal controls for the Department in order to monitor the use of Department resources, create and assess purchasing reports, enable proper stewardship of University funds, and assist in the management of Sponsored Research funds.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Dawn Tilbury
Graduate Student Instructor Miguel Saez
Project Name Secure Cloud Manufacturing
Student Members Steven Lengieza,
Project Description The manufacturing industry is constantly seeking novel solutions to improve productivity and gain a competitive advantage. Considering the large amount of data that manufacturing operations generate, the capability to make a smart decision is tied to the ability to process plant floor data to gain insight into machine and system level performance. This work aims to bridge the gap between the plant floor operation and ""Big Data"" analysis solutions to help improve manufacturing productivity, quality, and sustainability. The proposed framework incorporates three main elements: data sourcing, analysis, and visualization. The combination of these aspects lay the groundwork for processing large amounts of data on a multi-layer infrastructure that leverages both edge and cloud computing. The data processing framework was tested using a manufacturing testbed with machines, robots, conveyors, and different types of sensors to replicate the different data sources in a manufacturing plant. The data processing infrastructure was used to monitor machine health, detect anomalies, and evaluate throughout.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. David R. Dowling
Sponsor Naval Engineering Education Consortium
Project Name Improvements for Underwater Source Level Measurement per ANSI/ASA S12.64
Student Members Eamon Kummert
Project Description The University of Michigan’s Naval Engineering Education Consortium (NEEC) team project allows undergraduate students to research acoustic problems of interest to the U.S. Navy while learning relevant experimental skills. This project’s goal is to evaluate the ANSI/ASA S12.64 standard for measuring underwater sound from ships and identify techniques that account for reflections off the sea’s surface, which are inevitable but may not be fully ameliorated within the scope of this standard. We will present our analysis of the ANSI standard using laboratory experiments that have been scaled to fit within a 1.07-meter-diameter water tank.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Professor Steven Yalisove
Sponsor Engineering Honors Program
Project Name Ultrafast Optical Science: A Study on Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Gallium Arsenide
Student Members Magel Su,
Project Description The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are observed in semiconductors such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Under different ultrafast laser fluences, surface damage can range from two distinct types of LIPSS, high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) and low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), to ablation and melting. The model for HSFL formation in gallium arsenide postulates that ultrafast laser irradiation generates Frenkel pairs through a band-gap collapse mechanism. As the interstitials diffuse to the surface, they coalesce with other atoms to form islands on the surface. The surface islands grow large enough to couple with subsequent laser fields, eventually altering absorption of the light enough to organize the morphology in HSFL. A study of HSFL formation on GaAs demonstrates effects of laser fluence, pulse rate, and other factors on HSFL formation.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Jun Ni and Dr. Grant Kruger
Project Name Intelligent System to Detect Atrial Flutter in Electrocardiogram Waveforms
Student Members Yossi Cohen
Project Description Atrial flutter (AFL) is a common form of arrhythmia resulting from the atria beating faster than the ventricles of the heart. Left undetected, patients who suffer from AFL could develop severe blood clotting that could lead to a heart attack or a stroke. Like other forms of arrhythmia, doctors use electrocardiogram (ECG) signals to detect atrial flutter in patients. While doctors can read ECG signals and diagnose patients accordingly, the current state of the art is rather tedious and lacks automation. In this effort, an intelligent system is proposed as a decision support system that will enable doctors to secure an accurate diagnosis in a timely fashion. The utilization of artificial intelligence (AI) tools is introduced to provide robust atrial flutter classification enabled by supervised machine learning techniques. In this research, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used to classify between atrial flutter and normal sinus rhythm episodes from benchmark data obtained from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database on a feature space extracted from performing heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and reduced via principal component analysis (PCA). By using artificial intelligence, patterns within ECG waveforms are learned, enabling the implementation of an effective intelligent system that can autonomously classify atrial flutter from normal sinus rhythm.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Anish Tuteja
Graduate Student Instructor Abhishek Dhyani
Project Name Durable Icephobic Coatings
Student Members Antonia Deller
Project Description Ice accretion is a major problem in many areas - aircrafts and wind turbines to name a few. The goal of this project is to design icephobic coatings that meet 2 distinct requirements: (1) has low enough ice adhesion strength for the passive removal of ice (2) and is durable enough to withstand extreme conditions as well as multiple icing/de-icing cycles. One of the ways to satisfy both requirements is to make icephobicity an inherent property of the coating. This is often difficult because there exists a trade-off between durability which tends to be a property of stiff coatings and low ice adhesion which tends to be a property of soft coatings. One of the major goals of this project is to determine how we can balance those trade-offs to meet industry-specific requirements.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Jason Corso
Project Name NutriSnap
Student Members Kevin Wallace
Project Description Nutrition is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle, but one that is hard to keep track of and rife with misconceptions. Currently, most UM students who want to track their daily nutrition intake use an app called MyFitnessPal. Students individually look up and add the dish they consumed and MyFitnessPal calculates total calories consumed, along with other statistics. This process is tedious, does not account for variance in portion size, and relies on students understanding their own nutritional goals. Using my project, students will simply take a picture of their meal and all said statistics will be automatically calculated. Additionally, portion size will be calculated via photo.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Jose Alfaro
Project Name Off-grid Electricity Generation for a Residential Community in Liberia
Student Members Brinda Yarlagadda
Project Description Liberia has one of the lowest rates of public access to electricity in the world and one of the highest costs of electricity. The situation has left many to consider alternative options, such as off-grid community generation. This presents opportunities for the usage of technologies such as diesel, solar, and biomass. Liberia's solar insolation shows good prospects for the application of solar PV technology, and its abundant agricultural residues present the option to combust biomass residues for energy. In this project, I use Hybrid Optimization of Multiple Energy Resources (HOMER) software to evaluate the optimal mix of these three technologies to satisfy the electricity demand of a community in Liberia.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Lonnie Shea
Project Name CRISPR/Cas9 as reporter delivery for transcription factor activity analysis in breast cancers
Student Members Kallen Schwark
Project Description This project examines the role of transcription factors (TFs) in the development of trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer. CRISPR/Cas9 was chosen to be tested as an improved method of delivering TF reporters into breast cancer cell lines, and many TFs were examined to obtain dynamic data to analyze network signaling patterns of cellular responses.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Professor Duane Boning
Sponsor Engineering Honors Program; AIM Photonics; National Science Foundation
Graduate Student Instructor Germaine Martinez
Project Name Design of Silicon Photonic Ring Resonators for Manufacturing
Student Members Stuart Daudlin
Project Description Electronic integrated circuits are not able to meet the ever-increasing demand for bandwidth and need to reduce energy waste in metal interconnects (US data centers consumed ~70 billion kWh of electricity in 2014, equivalent to 6.4 million US households). Photonic integrated circuits are a viable way of attacking these and other issues by increasing the efficiency and performance of data communication. However, photonic devices are substantially sensitive to manufacturing variations. This work characterized the effect of variations on a critical photonic device (the ring resonator) and developed design suggestions to improve robustness.

 

Course Honors
Faculty Advisor Prof. James Cutler
Sponsor NASA JPL
Graduate Student Instructor Robert Gitten
Project Name Mars Drop: Mission Design for a Network of Deployable Surveillance Ground Sensors
Student Members Michael A. May
Project Description As the human population continues to grow, resources are consumed at a faster rate than they can be replenished. Furthermore, locations where human life can be sustained are being reduced due to mankind's impact on the environment. In response, scientists and entrepreneurs alike have considered the possibility of establishing and sustaining human life off planet Earth. Several efforts have already been made to explore this possibility, including designing reusable rockets, sending probes into space to study nearby planets, and searching for new planets among the constellations. NASA, for example, has designed several missions that recover information from astronomical bodies within the solar system. Among these missions are the Mars Orbital Surveyors and Rovers, which have retrieved valuable data about the planet’s atmosphere, surface, and magnetic field. While we have gathered groundbreaking information from Mars by sending spacecraft and rovers, we still have not sent a manned mission to the planet. Despite the development of the ISS, the last time man physically took a step on another astronomical body was 1972. In the hope of expanding mankind’s knowledge and furthering human life off Earth, NASA and SpaceX are now striving to send humans to Mars. As a result, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) will be working in collaboration with the University of Michigan Aerospace Department to develop a mission and send a spacecraft that will deploy a series of ground sensors to form a surveillance network and determine potential landing sites for astronauts. The project will consist on designing the entirety of the mission, including orbit planning, spacecraft systems, sensor deployment, and data transmission.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Kira Barton
Project Name Airborne Wind Energy Flight Path Design Using Economic Iterative Learning Control
Student Members Maxwell Wu
Project Description Airborne wind energy (AWE) systems have garnered significant attention in recent years as novel sources of renewable energy. Whereas conventional wind energy systems are fixed stationary to the ground, AWE systems utilize a tethered lifting body such as a kite, aerostat, glider, etc. that generate energy as the device traverses in the air. With this design, AWE systems reduce material requirements while also having the additional ability to access high-altitude winds. This flexibility in the altitude of operation is critical, as more energy can generally be harvested from high- altitude winds which makes AWE systems particularly interesting in the rapidly developing field of renewable energy. The performance of AWE systems relies largely on the flightpath of the lifting body through space. Optimization of the flight pattern of the system is then desired to increase energy production. Due to the repetitiveness of the motion of AWE systems, the harvesting of energy can be increased by learning from previous iterations to determine how to modify the future behavior of the system. In particular, Iterative Learning Control (ILC) has demonstrated the ability to improve performance in manufacturing processes and may be implemented in AWE systems to improve performance. This concept can be used to update flight patterns in order to maximize the profitability (i.e., energy production) of the AWE system. The goal of this project is then to develop a theoretical ILC framework that will allow for the maximization of a profitability objective in iterative processes such as those performed by AWE systems.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Nicholas Kotov
Project Name Chiral Inorganic Nanomaterials
Student Members Heather Calcaterra,
Project Description Chirality can be understood as the inability of a geometric structure to be superimposed upon its mirror image. Inorganic nanomaterials are a useful platform for further studying the effects of chirality because they exhibit chirality induced optical (chiroptical) effects that can be tuned by changing nanoscale size and shape. I research the synthesis, structure-property relationships, and selective interactions of chiral nanomaterials, particularly semiconducting quantum dots and helices, at the Kotov Lab. The purpose of my work is to use self-assembly properties to create chiral nanoparticles and larger assembled helices with increased enantiomeric excess (the degree to which one enantiomer is more prevalent in a system) and to try to control their geometric parameters. I have studied how their optical properties and affinity for each other and biological entities such as proteins changes.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Professor Keith Riles
Project Name Folding Analysis
Student Members Kaushik Rao
Project Description Folding Analysis is an algorithm designed to analyze data from various LIGO data streams. The algorithm is designed to identify periodic artifacts in these data streams through repeated averaging. We applied this analysis technique, and we were able to identify examples of these kinds of artifacts.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Professor Ronald Larson
Project Name Shear Modulus of Polymer-Bridged Colloidal Network with Surface-Fixed and Surface-Exploring Polymer Ends
Student Members Patrick McCauley
Project Description This project evaluates the shear relaxation modulus of two polymer-bridged colloidal networks: one with surface-anchored polymer ends, and one with surface exploring polymer ends. The results of this project will inform other models used in the Larson group to study the rheological properties of water-borne coatings.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Stephen Kemp
Project Name Peripheral Nerve Injury and Hetorotopic Ossification
Student Members Zaid Khatib
Project Description The goal of this project is to develop and use a reliable in-vivo model for the investigation of the role peripheral nerve injury has on heterotopic ossification, the process by which bone forms in abnormal anatomic locations. Additionally, we use the models in parallel with in-vitro assays to probe molecules of interest and elucidate their roles in this poorly-understood phenomenon.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Prof. Jenna Wiens
Sponsor MiCHAMP
Project Name Data-Driven Tools for Predicting the Onset of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Student Members Daniel Zeiberg, Tejas Prahlad, Tejas Prahlad
Project Description Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a lung injury found in hospital patients where fluid and inflammatory cells permeate the lungs preventing effective gas transport. If untreated, ARDS can result in bad infections and even death. Evidence suggests that ARDS is diagnosed late or not at all in over 70% of all cases. The goal of this project is to develop a model that can automatically identify which hospital patients are at highest risk of developing ARDS using machine learning methods. The current method use rule-based systems to predict which patients are at risk of developing ARDS, but our analysis shows that this method does not generalize well to different populations. Our method uses data from the first six hours of a patients stay to learn a regularized logistic regression model that predicts whether a patient will develop ARDS at any subsequent point in their hospital stay. We also evaluate how our model performs in making repeated predictions throughout a patient’s hospital stay on whether that patient will develop ARDS in the next 24 hours.

 

Course HONORS
Faculty Advisor Professor Heath Hofmann
Sponsor Engineering Honors Program
Project Name Michigan Hybrid Racing: Project Management
Student Members Carli Huber, Justin Lee
Project Description Michigan Hybrid Racing is an engineering student project team that designs, builds, and tests a Formula-style hybrid vehicle to compete at the Formula Hybrid SAE competition in New Hampshire. This year a new 18-month design cycle, project management tools, and project scope have enabled improved new member recruitment, earlier vehicle testing, and more efficient planning for future vehicles.

 

Course HONORS/ EECS 467
Faculty Advisor Prof. Benjamin Kuipers
Graduate Student Instructor Sagar Israni
Project Name MBot Navigation
Student Members Pearce Reickert, Larissa Lu, Tae Hyun Kim
Project Description This project encompasses the development of an interface for directing a robot to its destination. This will be useful in future projects and fields in which an operator controls the high level destination of a robot, but the robot must reach the destination itself. Generally the project will have two stages. In the first stage, an operator will be presented with a choice whenever the robot comes to a decision point. The operator will make the decision and the robot will navigate to the next decision point (for example, the next turn in the hallway). In the second stage, the robot will be given a world map and a high-level destination and decide for itself which branches to take as it navigates to its destination.

Industrial and Operations Engineering

Location of IOE projects: Pierpont Commons, Duderstadt Portico (outside)

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Daniel Reaume
Sponsor Wayne County Airport Authority
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name Airport AutoTech
Student Members Densu Dixon, Calista Atmadja, Elise Hsiung, Jiaming (Chester) Yang, Brianna Byrdie
Project Description WCAA hired our team to determine the feasibility of implementing select autonomous technologies at DTW. Our aim is to provide recommendations that will justify an investment decision in the near future and benefit the client’s brand image in providing best-in-class operation services for highly reputable airline companies.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Dr. Daniel J. Reaume
Sponsor DecaDome
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name DecaDome Packaging
Student Members Julian Fiallo, Garrett Prost, Chidi Bosah, Jasen Liman, Mengjie Chen
Project Description Our senior design team is working with DecaDome, a company that provides safe and secure temporary shelters to people throughout the world. Currently, these lightweight shelters have no standardized package and the shelter panels are not arranged within the package to optimize assembly time or ease of use. Our team has collected current state data by conducting time studies, collecting DecaDome® measurements, benchmarking against industry leaders for emergency relief shelters and assembly processes, and completing project research. We plan to use this data to produce our final deliverables: a new DecaDome® package prototype and new assembly instructions based on the package design. This new package design should enable standardization among future DecaDome® packages and easy construction for DecaDome® customers.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Dr. Daniel Reaume
Sponsor DecaDome® Shelters
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name DecaDome® Manufacturing Design
Student Members Nick Theodoracatos, Praneet Gogireddy, Zoe Schlessel, Chenfei Wu, Zhitong Xie
Project Description The DecaDome® disaster relief shelters currently do not have a systemized manufacturing process; however, to scale up their production, the manufacturing design should be refined. The DecaDome® Manufacturing Design team focuses on optimizing the current assembling process and making better choice of materials for the 11-foot-tall model of DecaDome®. Decisions for recommendations are made mainly through the results from statistical analysis of time studies data and cost-benefit evaluations. Recommended new process and materials will be applied to build a new prototype. It will show to what extent the time and cost to construct a DecaDome® on site are reduced, while its safety and user satisfaction enhanced.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Professor Prakash Sathe
Sponsor Penske Logistics
Project Name Freight Matching Optimization
Student Members Louis Goedker, Jonathan Lizardo, Adysti Kardi, Ayush Agrawal
Project Description Penske trucks deliver freight over long distances, but are left empty for their return trips. Freight matching will connect customers with reciprocal routes to increase truck utilization.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Prakash Sathe
Sponsor MNP Corporation
Project Name Material Flow Case Study at MNP
Student Members Danielle Marzetti, Sarah Carter, Nicholas Gust, Renze Li
Project Description MNP Corporation is looking to increase their parts produced per labor hour by 5%. MNP believe that they have material flow problems but does not have concrete data to support these claims. Therefore, MNP needs to have objective data collected and analyzed to determine the extent of the material flow problems. The analyzed data will be used to model possible plant alterations to increase the parts produced per labor hour. One proposed process will make minimal changes to the existing system while the other makes major changes. MNP has employed NRDS Engineering Consultants to collect the data, analyze it, and produce plant models showing NRDS proposed alterations.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Daniel Reaume
Sponsor Integrated Healthcare Associates
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name Healthcare Facility of the Future
Student Members William Aherne, Anita Zhang, Nabeel Sumbal, Matthew Miller, Vedant Shah
Project Description Physicians currently have some of the highest rates of burnout of any profession. A local healthcare group wants to address this in their workplace, however they cannot sacrifice certain things such as patient throughput and satisfaction. By improving the work process and layout of a local facility, this healthcare group wants to meet these goals by testing new layouts through simulation and studying a specific facility’s workflow.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Dr. Daniel Reaume
Sponsor Wayne Country Airport Authority
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name Pavement Warming and Snow Melting Technologies
Student Members Paola Romero, Greg Domeno, Dehao Zhang, Drew Sperduto, William Yang
Project Description The team is partnering with Detroit Metropolitan Airport to identify and analyze potential technologies to melt the snow and ice on runways and pavements. Two or three solutions will be recommended based on the cost, safety, and environmental concerns. The goal is to help the airport staff find a way to clear snow faster in order to avoid delays and increase safety.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Dan Reaume
Sponsor Principal Financial Group
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name ETF Rebalancing Process Study
Student Members Olivia Pellerito, Sanjeev Gupta, Yang Lu, Alexa Peltier, Fernando Sa
Project Description The IOE Senior Design Team worked with Principal Financial Group to assess the current state of the company’s Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) rebalancing process. ETF Rebalancing is the process of realigning the weightings of a portfolio of assets and involves periodically buying or selling assets in a portfolio to maintain an original desired level of asset allocation. This process is highly complex and spans multiple internal and external parties, which leads to incomplete visibility. Through this current state assessment, the team has identified all parties and stakeholders involved in the ETF rebalancing process and has created a complete process map of the rebalancing process. By doing so, the team was able to identify process inefficiencies and provide recommendations. Additionally, the team has designed an automatic rebalancing system that calculates how many shares of each asset to buy and sell to match the new index.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Dr. Daniel Reaume
Project Name Ford Motor Company
Student Members Mathias Zink Koelle, Adrian Lanigan, Matt Ross, Sabrina Rolz, Maggie Henry
Project Description Our team has developed a project management tool to aid Ford in standardizing the construction of part warehouses across the world.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Dr. Prakash Sathe
Sponsor Michigan Theater
Project Name Improving Ticketing
Student Members Sarah Lewandowski, Jordan Schebil, Kelly Schwab, Sonia Thosar
Project Description The State Theatre, now under Michigan Theater management, reopened its doors to the public after a year of renovation in December of 2017. Management is concerned with lobby layout at the State Theatre and ticketing, membership policies, and customer processes at both theaters. The goals of this project are to reduce customer confusion, reduce customer waiting time, and increase overall customer satisfaction. Data has been gathered through time studies, customer surveys, employee interviews, and observations of theater processes. These methods allowed us to create a final ticketing process map for both theaters, simulate the customer process at the State Theatre, quantify and assess performance data, and collect general employee and management feedback. Our problem solutions have been analyzed using ProModel, Minitab, and lean manufacturing concepts.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Daniel J. Reaume
Sponsor Urban Science
Project Name To the Max! with Enhanced Paid Search
Student Members Minmin Zhang, Chun He, Nikil Ramanathan, Matthew Schiele, Xiyu Zhao, Zhining Zhou
Project Description Our team work with the advanced analytics team at Urban Science to develop optimal, trustworthy paid search spending algorithms. We research a myriad of topics that are related to optimization, python, numerical algorithms, and the current algorithms that Urban Science is using. With this information, our team pick several optimal algorithms and implement them with Python. The new solutions generate a better optimal paid search forecast.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Daniel Reaume
Sponsor MDP
Graduate Student Instructor Stephanie Brereton
Project Name Improving and optimizing MDP's scheduling system
Student Members Alvaro Perez, Ryan Lentine, Simran Baxendale, Nathan Freytag, Anyu Lu
Project Description Multidisciplinary Design Program has asked the IOE 424 team to reduce the time their scheduling tool takes to identify optimal meeting times for approximately 50 projects of around 5 to 9 students each. In addition, the new system needs to be designed to be user friendly for all who interface with the scheduling system. The team analyzed the data and developed a recommendation to either adapt or redesign the scheduling system to improve the usability and functionality as well as improve the time required to find an optimal solution.

 

Course IOE 424
Faculty Advisor Prof. Prakash Sathe
Sponsor Motawi Tileworks
Project Name Product Launch Management
Student Members Yifei Wang, Xubo Liu, Brett Saunders, Usukhbayar Enkhjargal
Project Description Motawi Tileworks is currently struggling to define a clear timeline of the necessary steps in the manufacturing process and to estimate new product launch dates and cycles. These errors make it difficult for the company to predict the correct production schedule for each respective tile launch. In order to launch new tiles effectively, our team - BOXY Consulting Group analyzed the historical data we collected from the plant by using methods such as: time study and lean six sigma. We will provide Motawi Tileworks with a master launch schedule.

Multidisciplinary Design Program

Location of MDP projects: Duderstadt Atrium

table> Course MDP Faculty Advisor Prof. Darren McKague Sponsor MDP Project Name Mapleseed Inspired Atmospheric Sensing Instrument Student Members Andrew Ma Project Description The Mapleseed team is developing a novel system for studying Earth’s climate by using a wireless network of maple seed inspired free-falling in-situ sensors. Maple seeds (samara seeds) are natural wind drifters which allows them to travel very far. By releasing dozens to hundreds of synthetic maple seed flyers equipped with sensors and wireless capabilities, atmospheric dynamics and environmental properties can be studied with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution.

 

Course MDP
Faculty Advisor Huei Peng
Sponsor Denso
Project Name Denso Intersection
Student Members Shiyu Wang, Mert Selamet, Yaxin Luan, Sheng-ping Chuang, Dongqing Xia
Project Description Our final goal is to create a simulation of conditions in a specific, complicated US intersection and use the results to teach the autonomous driving system how to act in similar scenarios. This will help Denso develop their control model and test them in a much easier way.

 

Course MDP
Faculty Advisor Professor Sugih Jamin
Sponsor ProQuest
Project Name Improve Drug Safety through Deep Learning
Student Members Aditi Deshpande, Jason Jin, Baixu Chen, Xiaotian Zhan, Huimin He, Minjun Zhao, Guanchao Huang
Project Description The objective of this project is to leverage the power of machine learning to improve the literature review process. By using historical data generated by the manual review process, we will train multiple models to identify references that contain reportable drug safety information.

 

Course MDP
Faculty Advisor Dr. Darren McKague
Project Name DUST (Distributed Universal Satellite Technology)
Student Members Taylor Sun, James Boyce, Enoch Lee, Andres Peñaranda
Project Description Distributed Universal Satellite Technology (DUST) enables the iSATcon mission architecture, a NASA JPL proposed mission for 24/7 global emergency communications. A DUST Tech Demo would prove out this technology demonstrating a mesh communication network between the nodes of a three CubeSat constellation.

Student Organizations

Location of Student Orgs: Duderstadt Atrium, Duderstadt Connector

Course Student Org - Intelligent Ground Vehicle Team
Faculty Advisor Prof. Matthew Johnson-Roberson
Project Name GOAT: Ground Obstacle Avoidance Transport
Student Members Nicholas VanDyke, Adarash Mishra, Rahul Gupta, Chris Marsh, Greg Meyer, Madhav Goli, Andres Echeverria
Project Description The Ground Obstacle Avoidance Transport, or GOAT, is an intelligent rover that can interpret the environment around it and act accordingly. Thousands of data points from a stereo camera, LiDAR, and other sensors are collected and interpreted every second in a quest to navigate an obstacle course autonomously. Using a custom-built chassis and two-wheel drive, the GOAT is nimble enough to react on a dime.

 

Course Student Org - MDP Team Aquador
Faculty Advisor Prof. Erdogan Gulari
Project Name Project Aquador
Student Members Lauro Sebastian Ojeda, Katherine Lastoskie, Jack Pelletier, Jill Porretta, Rohan Chandran, Drew Smiley, Camille Latour
Project Description Team Aquador is focused on creating a sustainable water treatment system to clean contaminated fresh water sources in several regions in Ecuador. Our mission is to design, build, and implement a system that will be easy to use and maintain by the local communities. Our goal is to target the coastal regions that were heavily affected by the 2016 earthquake and help rebuild their water treatment infrastructure. Additionally, we hope to work with the communities in the Ecuadorian jungle region, which have the highest reported mortality rates due to waterborne diseases. A focal point in our system will also be to utilize the abundant natural sources of energy (solar and hydroelectric) so that our system can power itself. We intend to make our system utilizing as much recycled, thrown out, and easily accessible material found in the regions. This way, we hope to share our design with local communities to help them continue making their own water treatment systems.

 

Course Student Org - Michigan Jet Engine Team
Faculty Advisor Tim Smith
Project Name MJET Custom Engine
Student Members Mitchell Gartland, Xiao Kai Luo, Rob Shoemaker, Kenneth Greene
Project Description Michigan Jet Engine Team (MJET) is looking to develop a small jet engine. This engine will be completely designed and manufactured in-house. It will be a test bed for metal additive manufacturing. We seek to increase the interest in gas turbine engines among University of Michigan students by demonstrating it is possible to design, build, and test a fully working engine as a student project team.

 

Course Student Org: Michigan Hybrid Racing
Faculty Advisor Prof. Heath Hofmann
Project Name Custom High Power Inverter for Tractive Applications
Student Members Joseph Saginaw
Project Description Our mission is to design, build, test, and finance our own high-performance, hybrid-electric Formula-style race car. This year we have started development of a custom motor controller, or inverter, for future use on our all-electric vehicles. This inverter must comply with competition mandated rules and meet various design and functional requirements including but not limited to size, weight, electrical ratings, robustness, and manufacturability. The inverter being presented is a functional prototype of the versions to be implemented on the 2019 race car.
Course MHEAL - PROJECT MESA - MDP Faculty Advisor Professor Aileen Huang-Saad Project Name Project MESA Student Members Katie Munson, Shreya Wadhwani, Maya Ben Efraim, Jen Spiegel, Samantha Fox, Rhea Verma, Shriya Suresh, Mary Munsell Project Description Despite being highly preventable with regular screening tests to identify pre-cancerous conditions, cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer among women in developing countries, where it causes almost 200,000 deaths each year. Nicaragua has the highest mortality rate from cervical cancer in Latin America. Regular gynecological examinations are necessary to screen for pre-cancerous conditions. However, gynecological exams are difficult to conduct in rural mobile clinics within Nicaragua because of a lack of portable and affordable equipment. Clinicians travel upwards of six hours to reach rural communities and are only able to bring supplies they can physically carry. As a result, many exams are conducted on household beds or tables in poor lighting conditions, not only making the exams unsterile and uncomfortable for both the staff and patient, but also limiting the success and efficiency of identifying health-risks. M-HEAL‰Ûªs Project MESA (Making Examinations Safe & Accessible) is developing a portable gynecological examination table that can be carried like a backpack for easy transportation within mobile clinics to rural communities in Nicaragua. Prototypes of the table are being used by multiple clinics in Nicaragua, and current design efforts are focused on developing a more effective and easily manufacturable product.

Mechanical Engineering

Location of ME Projects:

ME 450: Duderstadt Room 1180, Duderstadt Portico (outside) & EECS Building

ME 589: EECS Building

For project-specific location information, please refer to the Design Expo booklet linked at the top of this page. 

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Schultz
Sponsor Camp Michigania
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Improvement of Dining Hall Acoustics at Camp Michigania
Student Members J. Zachary Teitel, Jordan Bannan, William Horner, Joel Jepson
Project Description The dining hall at Camp Michigania (owned and operated by the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan, located on Walloon Lake near Boyne City, Michigan) is used by all campers, and can become very loud during times of heavy use. The goal of this project is to make recommendations for acoustical improvements to the space, and possibly demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype(s).

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Schultz
Sponsor KID
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name KID Mattress Measurement
Student Members Lucas Barnes, Austin Benoit, Nate Woznick
Project Description "Part of the guidance to protect infants as they sleep is that infants should sleep on a firm mattress, yet standards do not exist to determine firmness/softness of mattresses. This has caused confusion among new parents who believe that their own mattress may be firmer than the infants crib mattress. This project consists of design of a transportable tool to test how deep of an indent into the mattress (proxy for softness) is made when an object the size and weight of an infant‰Ûªs head is placed (facedown) on the mattress."

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Schultz
Sponsor Matthaei Botanical Gardens
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Matthaei Botanical Garden: Heating a Conservatory Pool
Student Members Brian Barnes, Alex Apfel, Brian Barnes, Alec Brennan
Project Description Matthaei Botanical Gardens needs to heat a 10ft diameter pool to around 80 degrees Fahrenheit in order to grow tropical water lilies and mangrove trees. Currently the pool has no heating and is below the required temperature year round. We have been tasked with developing a warming strategy for the pool.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Schultz
Sponsor Matthaei Botanical Gardens
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Matthaei Botanical Garden: Cooling of Administrative Spaces
Student Members Byungwook Paul Choi, Alexa Kerschenheiter, Eric Li, Nicholas Marek
Project Description Our project consists of the development of a strategy to cool the Matthaei Botanical Garden administrative spaces by a few degrees in order to create a more habitable workspace.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Schultz
Sponsor Matthaei Botanical Gardens (Campus Farm)
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Cold Root Vegetable Storage
Student Members Paul Elder, Bailey Keefer, John Weeks
Project Description Our project consists of the development of an energy efficient temperature regulation strategy for root vegetable storage in a Campus Farm shed basement, similar to an updated root cellar.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Wineman
Sponsor Danielle Gandee
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Mobility Device Improvements: Wheelchair for Soccer
Student Members Amy Zhou, Connor Bergin, Lawrence Dreisbach, Henry Lewis, Nishanth Subramaniam
Project Description Braden wants to be able to play soccer with his brother and friends while in his power wheelchair. Our project consists of the development of a system to ""kick"" a soccer ball on grassy terrain and block the ball from rolling under the chair so that Braden can participate in a typical soccer game.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Wineman
Sponsor Livingston County Grand Equestrian Therapeutic Riding Program
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Livingston Grand County Equestrian Therapeutic Riding Program
Student Members Martin Safie, Hermione Li, Connor Lushin
Project Description Livingston County Grand Equestrian Therapeutic Riding Program assists physically challenged youth strengthen their muscles by riding horses. A program participant has outgrowing the specialized high back saddle which supports her on the horse, and by next summer, this saddle will not give her the necessary support she needs. She has been riding for the last seven years and is one of the highlights of her summer. Due to insufficient funds to purchase a new saddle, this project consists of developing a different type of back support system that would be taller and lighter with a quick release mechanism that would be able to support a taller individual allowing them to sit more upright, thus using their muscles properly and helping to alleviate strain on the side walkers.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Wineman
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Variable Stiffness Ankle Orthosis
Student Members Nikko Van Crey, Jacob Byrd, Marcos Cavallin, Brad Check, Riley Doherty, Kevin Wang
Project Description This project consists of the prototyping of an orthosis device capable of providing biomimetic support to a disfunctional or injured ankle.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Sponsor WCC
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name 3D Printing with Chocolate
Student Members Shreya Raman, Matthew George, Justin Joseph, Ibraheem Malik
Project Description In collaboration with students from WCC, this project consists of the adaption of a Lulzbot ‰ÛÒ TAZ6 3D printer with equipment used to fabricate parts requiring variation in material viscosity. The materials use for this application will be chocolate and fruit paste. Viscous materials are being adapted to 3D printers today, especially in the bio-engineering areas where tissue/cell growth is being explored. Orchestrating machine motion in Cartesian space with flow of semi liquid material will be the major focus of the challenge, in addition to pre-post nozzle temperature and pre-post fluid pressure/feed rate adjustability.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Design of an Integrated Additive Nanomanufacturing System
Student Members Sam Shin, Yatri Patel, Anantharaman Sarma, Sam Shin, Xiangyi Ye
Project Description In today's economy of planned obsolescence, most consumer electronics can only be customized at the software level. In contrast, hardware that is specific to the user is out of economic reach for the vast majority of the world's population. Therefore, one of the key manufacturing challenges of the 21st century is the sustainable, energy-efficient, and cost-effective customizable production of systems that are personalized to each individual, which would enable a paradigm shift in the emerging field of personable health monitoring and wearable electronics. During the past year, the Dasgupta Research Group and Barton Research Group have developed an additive manufacturing system which is used for a high- throughput printing of nanomaterials with unparalleled resolution. For this project, students have developed a customized mechatronic actuation and mechanical support system for the printer, which is the central component of the larger integrated system, and a cooling system that rapidly cools the printing surface after the thin film coating process.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Sponsor Altair
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name AltAIR Hockey Table
Student Members Evan Brennan, Wade Dodge, Christopher Dulzo, Justin Ursaki
Project Description Altair Engineering subsidiary solidThinking would like to use their suite of software to design, manufacture, and test a functional, small-scale (approx. 4Õ x 2Õ) air hockey table along with an integrated robot that is capable of playing air hockey (competitively) against a human opponent. A full redesign of the table hardware using solidThinking Inspire and Evolve (CAD/optimization software) must be done to provide a more eye-catching and aesthetically pleasing look. The ultimate use of this product is to be transported to trade shows and fairs to demonstrate the vast capabilities of solidThinking software. Therefore, the product should utilize solidThinking software throughout the design process and showcase an optimized, organic-looking structure.
Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Autonomous Go-Kart
Student Members Alexander Coryell, Greg De Leon, Alexandra Hamlock, Eren Ozeren, Erik Soreide, Blake Steward, Matthew Wilner, Sahit Bollineni, Andrew Burrell, Chengyang Huang, Douglas Miller
Project Description This project involves the modification of existing systems and development of new designs in order to produce an autonomous go-kart to be used as a test-bed for the Formula Student Driverless competition.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name ME 250 Spring Demonstration Device
Student Members Alex Gamso, Grant Gauger, Paul Gudan, Joseph Skinner, Jacob VanderZanden
Project Description In the course ME 250 at U-M, students learn about mechanical elements, such as gears, bearings and springs. When these topics are addressed in lectures, it would be helpful to have demonstrator devices for students to see the theory in action. The goal of this project is to redesign a device specific to the lecture on springs, where three different springs could easily be loaded in a minimal amount of time. Following a discussion about spring parameters (such as coil angle, wire length, etc.), each of the three springs must release to launch a ball into the air at the same time, allowing the students to check their predictions about which spring would launch the ball to the greatest height. The loading/unloading must be repeatable and device must be easily transported.
Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Prof. Remy Quadruped Robot - Body
Student Members Matt Fergerson, Devin Kimberlin, Nick Mastruserio, Cody McKay, Ellen Tilford,
Project Description This project is part of a series of three interconnected modular projects that explore the mechanical design for a quadrupedal walking and running robot. Our project consists of mechanical prototype development of the body of a modular robot that has the ability to extend and retract, shift its weight laterally, and remain rigid during movement to ensure efficient movement of the legs.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Prof. Remy Quadruped Robot - Hips
Student Members Matthew Dee, Batuhan Altundas, Thomas Brown, Lucas Marks
Project Description This project is part of a series of three interconnected modular projects that explore the mechanical design for a quadrupedal walking and running robot. Our project consists of mechanical prototype development of the hip joints of the robot.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Hortop
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Prof. Remy Quadruped Robot - Legs
Student Members Josh Tyrrell, Jacob Griffith, Miho Morioka, Shane Penn, Josh Tyrrell
Project Description This project is part of a series of three interconnected modular projects that explore the mechanical design for a quadrupedal walking and running robot. Our project consists of mechanical prototype development of the legs of the robot.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Wineman
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Modification of a Posterior Posture Walker
Student Members Kenji Johnston, Kritin Arya, Matt Romzek, Chris Wit
Project Description The goal of this project was to help our client live a more independent lifestyle. Our client has cerebral palsy, a disability that impairs her motor skills and the strength of her legs. This requires her to use a posterior posture walker to help maintain her balance on both legs while moving around. Our team added a linear actuator and a switch mechanism to automate the folding of the walker (aiding in storage) and implemented C-shaped plates and additional wheels on the front legs of the walker to better align the walker's center of gravity with our client's (making it easier to travel up and down stairs). We decreased the weight of the walker by replacing the original aluminum frame with carbon fiber materials.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name M|Dining Automatic Stir Fry Maker
Student Members Miheer Patankar, Royce Chung, Austin Friedant, Maxwell Gross,
Project Description In order to reduce long wait times in South Quad Dining Hall, our project consists of automating the stir fry cooking station at the Two Oceans restaurant in South Quad.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Redesign of a Thermophoretic Sampling Device
Student Members Ryan Sebastian, Patrick Ferris, Sam Piazza, Paul Powers, Ryan Sebastian
Project Description We have been tasked with the redesign of a thermophoretic sampling device by our sponsor Professor Andre Boehman. This device is used to collect soot particles in engine exhaust through a process called thermophoresis in many of the engines located in the Autolab here at UoM. Thermophoresis is a process where cold particles are attracted to hot particles due to a temperature gradient. The current design is very outdated and takes a lot of time to set up compared to the actual time it takes to sample the engine exhaust. We aim to shorten the overall preparation time and improve user interface.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Sponsor JARP Industries
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name Linear Position Feedback Sensor
Student Members Timothy (Alex) Berka, Patrick Chirumbole, Matthew Sheehan, Teresa Tripodi, Matthew Waldmann
Project Description Measurement of the extension of hydraulic cylinders is necessary for safety and proper operation, however, while linear position measurement is well-established for single-rod hydraulics, it is less so for dual-rod applications. The goal of this project is to develop a system capable of being fit to dual-rod hydraulic cylinders of varying sizes to measure the hydraulic rod's linear position with high resolution.

 

Course ME 450
Faculty Advisor Saitou
Graduate Student Instructor Val Coldren and Lizzy Miranda
Project Name ISL Data Acquisition
Student Members Brendan Blake, Jason Chang, Vinay Hanasoge, Mohan Kothari
Project Description Instrumented spatial linkages (ISLs) are often the measurement system of choice for monitoring motion of anatomical joints. ISLs consist of a series of links and joints, which enable calculation of the position and orientation of one end of the linkage relative to the other end. The goal of this project is to develop an ISL data acquisition system for the upper arm/torso in order to characterizing the accuracy of algorithms that utilize data from IMUs embedded in wearable sensors.
Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Steven Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Lettuce Turnip the Beet
Student Members Jon Zwier, Ian Raber , Eva Koester , Dana Felberg
Project Description Assessment of the sustainability of Hydroponic Shipping Containers (Freight Farms) as compared to conventional farming using the necessary conditions for sustainability

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Dr. Steve Skerlos
Project Name Biocement for Sustainable Architecture
Student Members Richard Brady, Brian Iezzi, Selim Sardag, Benjamin Eu,
Project Description This project is a comparative Life Cycle Assessment of concrete bricks produced via microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP) and Conventional Masonry Units. MICP produced bricks offer the possibility to vastly reduce carbon emissions in an industry that produced over 800 million tons of CO2 in 2000. The LCA will focus on energy and resource demands of both processes, as well as the impacts of transporting MICP produced bricks to distant areas of construction.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Steven Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Cell Phone + solar panel + external battery = Sustainable?
Student Members Benjamin Golder, Davied Cordero, Wayne Poulsen
Project Description This project looks at External cell phone battery chargers with included solar panel. The study will look at the energy saved by the product vs. the waste and emissions used to make and dispose of it. Analyses that will be included but not limited to are Global warming potential and eco-toxicity.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steven Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name From Waste to Wasted: Misadventures in Sustainable Vodka Production
Student Members Amy Goodell, Nirvan Bhattacharyya, Sarah Rogers, Avery Demond
Project Description Forty percent of food produced in the United States is wasted. The majority of this ends up in landfills, where it is a major contributor to methane gas emissions. Misadventure & Co, a start-up company in San Diego, CA, diverts expired baked goods from landfills and uses them as the feedstock to produce vodka. To investigate whether this production process is more sustainable, a life-cycle analysis (LCA) was performed comparing it to that at another small-scale vodka distillery than uses local virgin wheat as its feedstock, and a large-scale commercial vodka distillery that ships its wheat in over long distances. A focus of the LCA is the environmental impact of transportation, as it is anticipated, that although the commercial distillery may be more economic, the long distances over which the wheat is transported to the distillery and the distances over which the vodka is transported to the consumer will dominate the sustainability picture.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steven Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name But bidet a minute
Student Members Robert Loweth, Naser Almutairi, Suzanne Chou, Gloria Chun,
Project Description Comparing environmental and economic impacts of using bidets and toilet paper for restroom hygiene.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Unmanned Aerial Drone for Pizza Delivery
Student Members Yi Ren, Justin Lee, Ellis Herman
Project Description A full LCA analysis of unmanned aerial Drone for Pizza Delivery.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Hwan Lim
Project Name How Green is Blue Apron?
Student Members Alyssa Bennett, Isabelle Brogna, Syndey Forrester, Kyle Kenkel,
Project Description Blue Apron, a meal kit delivery service company, has made various sustainability claims regarding its service. This ME 589 project seeks to evaluate the claims regarding Blue Apron's delivery process by conducting a comparative life-cycle assessment (LCA) on Blue Apron's delivery process and traditional food delivery through visiting a grocery store. This LCA is used to help determine if the reduced food miles traveled is negated by the extra packaging required by Blue Apron. Comparisons are also performed on air pollutants and solid waste.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name StreamTeam
Student Members Gregory Auerbach, Aditya Nair, Kory Nelson, Abhijeet Walchale
Project Description Every day millions of people watch movies and TV shows on online streaming websites (like Hulu or Netflix) or on physical media (like Blu-Ray Discs or DVDs). The purpose of the study is to analyze the migration from physical entertainment media to streaming media. Specifically, we will analyze and compare the environmental impacts from the life of a movie or TV show on a disc, from disc writing to landfill, and on streaming media, from data transfer to media viewing. By analyzing these two entertainment viewing mediums, we hope to educate the general viewing audience which will allow them to make environmentally conscious viewing decisions.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Comparing the Sustainability of Plastic and Edible Cutlery
Student Members Michael Drake, Elizabeth Miranda, Andrew Kozminski, Xiao Bin Pan
Project Description Plastic waste continues to be a major issue around the world in society today. One major component is single use plastic cutlery, where millions of tons of waste are discarded globally each year. One solution that our team is examining is edible cutlery that can be either consumed by the user or composted. We conducted a life cycle analysis to compare these two products under certain conditions, looking at a variety of life cycle impacts such as solid waste, global warming potential, land use, and ecotoxicity.

 

Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Vroom for Improvement
Student Members Jacob Tukel, Chris Chiaravalli, Nina Janjic, Madison Strauss
Project Description "Our team conducted an environmental life cycle analysis of the bus transit system at the University of Michigan. We evaluated and weighed the benefits of the diesel buses and the electric-biodiesel hybrid buses used by the University, and determined which is the more sustainable option for serving riders on campus."

 

Course ME589
Faculty Advisor Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Aquaponics- A Sustainable Solution?
Student Members Hung-Chien Luh, Elijah Goldin, Trevin Malique Gretian Perera
Project Description Aquaponics has been advertised as reducing water, energy, and land use in agriculture. Our team would try to quantitatively prove it is more environmental friendly than traditional farming with Life Cycle Assessment and discuss little societal and economy impact.

 

Course MECHENG 589
Faculty Advisor Prof. Steven Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Hwan Lim
Project Name Libranerds
Student Members Karl Nunoo, Eric Harding, Xindi Huang, Gabrielle Vuylsteke
Project Description The Libranerds investigate how e-readers, e-libraries, and the servers that support them contribute to a sustainable future. This project is a comparative study of specific life cycle stages for traditional and e-library systems. We evaluate their respective strength and weaknesses with regards to environmental impact.
Course ME 589
Faculty Advisor Steve Skerlos
Graduate Student Instructor Tae Lim
Project Name Aquaponics- A Sustainable Solution?
Student Members Hung-Chien Luh, Elijah Goldin, Trevin Malique, Gretian Perera
Project Description Aquaponics has been advertised as reducing water, energy, and land use in agriculture. Our team would try to quantitatively prove it is more environmental friendly than traditional farming with Life Cycle Assessment and discuss little societal and economy impact.

Special Projects in Engineering

Location of ENGR 490 projects: Duderstadt Atrium

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. L. Jay Guo
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Restoring Contents of Blurred Images Using a Generative Adversarial Network
Student Members Pablo Moncada-Larrotiz, Marcus Segedin, Sean Hsu, Noah Schnitzer, Ming Ko Cho,
Project Description "We present a method to deblur single images with no extra information using a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN). There are two distinct categories of image blur: motion blur, and depth of field blur. We have trained two separate GAN, one specializing in learning how to remove motion blur from images and the other to remove depth of field blur. The user of our program will be presented with multiple output from each network and then select the best image. By providing multiple output, this allows for an added layer of feedback data to train our network. The end result is a simple website where the user can upload their blurry images and download a deblurred image within a few seconds."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. L. Jay Guo
Sponsor Mike Bottom: University of Michigan Exercise and Sports Science Initiative
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Creating Waterproof Sensors for Swimmers
Student Members Ryan Tepper, Panyakorn Rakpanitmanee, Bowen Zeng, Madison Kraniak, Daniel Zakrzewski, Max Blackburn, Antonia Deller,
Project Description "Our project centers around the development of a wearable underwater biometric data capturing system that can accurately generate heart rate data for swimmers on the U-M swim team, as well as display data in real-time for coaching analysis."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Wei Lu
Sponsor University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Greenhouse Cooling at Matthaei Botanical Gardens
Student Members Matthew Sweers, Rohan Alexander, Ian Cosgrove, Steven Jacobson, Hallie Byles, Bryan Culbert,
Project Description This project presents a solution for the cooling of research greenhouses at the University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens using sustainable methods. The primary objective is to cool the greenhouse temperatures from above 120 degrees F on a hot summer days to as close to outdoor temperatures as possible while maintaining necessary light levels for plant photosynthesis.

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Anish Tuteja
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Automated Gravimetric System to Reduce Maternal Mortality from Postpartum Hemorrhage
Student Members Suzanne Haupt, Michael Rahhal, Elizabeth Zwier, Allyson Dugan, Emily Durisin, Sarah Peterson,
Project Description "The number one cause of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries is postpartum hemorrhaging (PPH), which is defined as over 500 mL of blood loss. The standard diagnostic method if visual estimation of blood loss which is extremely inaccurate. It has been shown that the delayed diagnosis of PPH due to underestimation of blood loss accounts for up to 80% of PPH deaths. Our device replaces visual estimation of blood loss with a more accurate gravimetric method for measurements based on weighing saturated pads before and after use to calculate blood loss volume. Our system automates this method. It is composed of a receptable for the saturated pads that automatically subtracts the mass of the pad to determine the mass of the blood on the pad. The system tracks the blood loss as more pads are added to the receptable and interfaces with an alert system. The system also improves the blood loss measurement during the placental delivery by adding an additional collection pouch to the currently-used under-buttocks drape."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Wei Lu
Sponsor Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name EPA Airflow Sensor
Student Members Dashiell Lieberman, Julia DeBolt, Garrett Galia, Jeeho Lee, Jonathan Cordes,
Project Description "This project is to construct a prototype sensor to measure airflow in a tailpipe, and transmit that data to a laptop for exhaust emissions analysis."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Alan Taub
Sponsor Dr. Gary Fisher (Harry Helfman Professor of Molecular Dermatology at The University of Michigan - Ann Arbor Medical School)
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Keep Your Skin Up
Student Members Sabrina Caporuscio, Michael Allen, Andrew Murtland, Taylor Larsen, Gerald Lam,
Project Description "Our project is to create a mathematical model that represents the elasticity of the dermis layer of skin for use by the Department of Dermatology at The University of Michigan. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanics of skin, we are also creating a new sleeve to hold biopsy during testing so that the response of the sample can be viewed and tracked."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Anish Tuteja
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Increased Condenser Efficiency Using Functionalized Surfaces
Student Members Lauren Miller, Dylan Warner, Tyler Del Rose, John Houghton, Alex Escobar,
Project Description This project proposes a method of increasing condenser efficiency by creating a patterened surface on condenser tubes with hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. This surface will promote dropwise condensation and an increased number of active nucleation sites to maximize heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux.

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Wei Lu
Sponsor Dr. Brian Gilchrist (The University of Mcihigan)
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name MiTEE CubeSat Tether Deployer System
Student Members Sai Sivakumar, Keith Brodek, Jared Michaelson, Julie Rieland, Elliott Clark,
Project Description "MiTEE (Miniature Tethered Electrodynamics Experiment) is responsible for a pair of University of Michigan student designed small satelite missions (MiTEE-I and -II). The goal of these missions is to advance electrodynamic tether technology for propellantles propulsion in space for very small spacecraft called CubeSats. CubeSats are usually launched into low-Earth orbit (300-800 km) - most systems have lifetimes of only a few weeks due to drag at those altitutes. However, mission lifetime can be extended by ejective a positively-biased end mass connected to the CubeSat via an electrodynamic tether. A propulsive force is induced while traveling through Earth's ionosphere using Faraday's Law to keep the CubeSat airborne for longer periods of time than current systems allow. MiTEE-II will deploy a smartphone-sized end mass with a 30 meter (sub-millimeter diameter) conducting tether from a larger 10x10x30 cm CubeSat spacecraft. Our team has developed a conducting tether and deployment system for MiTEE-II that satisfies specific physical, electrical, environmental, and performance requirements."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Anish Tuteja
Sponsor N/A
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Biofouling Reduction
Student Members Cassidy Lukaart, Elizabeth Goulston, Aditya Tammana, Brandon Skoog,
Project Description This project involves the design of a micro bubbler system that provides a layer of protection to the bottom of a ship's hull in order to reduce the build up of fouling that occurs at port.

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Alan Taub
Sponsor Dr. Christine Nelson (The University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center)
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Physical Simulation Practice Tool for Lateral Canthonomy
Student Members Che Chan, Elizabeth Gager, Samyak Harsh, Chase Varner,
Project Description "When there is a buildup of pressure behind the eye, called retrobulbar hemmorrhage, the vision is threatened due to pressure being exerted on the optical nerve. In order to save a patient's vission, a lateral canthonomy needs to be performed immediately. Our prototype serves as a practice tool for surgical residents to perform on, in order to gain the necessary skills to perform this procedure."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Wei Lu
Sponsor JARP Industries
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Using Optical Sensors in Mobile Hydraulic Applications
Student Members Mitchell Baker, Quinton Ho, Shengting Shao, Nicholas Busuito,
Project Description "JARP Industries has proposed a novel non-invasive solution for monitoring the location of a piston inside of a hydraulic cylinder. The solution involves the installation of a transparent window in the gas-containing end of the cylinder through which light will be used to monitor piston position. A sensor which emits light through the window and records the intensity of reflected light should, in theory, allow for monitoring of internal piston position. Currently, the QVLA sensor has been proven to detect piston position in low-pressure pneumatic applications. However, JARP Industries also hopes to apply this technology to high-pressure pneumatic applications. The main goal of this project is to determine piston measurement accuracy for various sized cylinders using the QVLA sensor in addition to determining the limits of cylinder diameter and piston measurement distance."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Anish Tuteja
Sponsor Camp Michigania
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Camp Michigania Electric Vehicle Charging
Student Members Catherine Haslam, Ben Hagen, Carlee Meyers, Ashlynn Stanley, Sean Jones,
Project Description We are evaluating renewable energy and vehicle charging options for Camp Michigania.

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. L. Jay Guo
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Solar Power Tracking System for Trucks
Student Members John Wolfe, Peter Forhan, Perry Francois-Edward, Aymen Maktari,
Project Description We have designed a solar tracking system focused on reducing fuel consumption during truck idling.

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Alan Taub
Sponsor Joyworks LLC
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Austempered Ductile Iron Tow Hook
Student Members Kunal Haria, Grason Cheydleur, Carolina Frey, Andra Chen, Ron Keinan, Morgan Fry,
Project Description "The goal of this project was to determine the viability and benefits of using austempered ductile iron for a structural component in the Ford Superduty trucks (F-250 to F-550). The target component is a front recovery hook (""tow hook""). The current production tow hook is a six component steel part, each of which is stamped and welded together. The team was tasked with casting the hook as a single ductile iron component and reducing the mass and cost of the production hook by 15% and 10% respectively, while meeting the performance requirements of the original hook. The team reverse engineered the production hook and created a design that met the goals discussed above. The team worked with Joyworks, Applied Process (at heat treatment company), and Gil-Mar, a tier 1 supplier to Ford, to create the protoype."

 

Course ENGR 490
Faculty Advisor Prof. Alan Taub
Sponsor United States Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC)
Graduate Student Instructor Caleb Reese
Project Name Optimized Structural Components for Land Vehicles Produced by Additive Manufacturing
Student Members Drake Kress, Michael Fisher, Kaitlyn Haller, Breanna Decocker, Magel Su,
Project Description "The goal of this project was to optimize the mass and reduce the cost of low volume, structural, metallic components for land vehicles, while also ensuring that the parts are compatible with additive manufacturing."